First Coast High School NJROTC

Personal Qualification Standard (PQS)

A PQS is a written list of required knowledge and skills required for a person to have the proper qualification to maintain a position or rank. At our unit, the PQS is used to provide a list of requirements a cadet candidate beginning the program in their NS1 year must complete in order to earn their J-Bar, which is needed in order for a cadet to wear anything on their uniform beyond their nametag. Click on each General Order to see an explanation of its purpose.

General Orders to the Sentry

The purpose of the General Orders to the Sentry is to provide a list of rules that any personnel placed on watch duty will abide by. These orders help to prevent unwanted personal from accessing or causing damage to restricted areas and provide guidelines to minimize damage and injury in case of an emergency.

  1. Take charge of this post and all government property in view.
    The number of the post, type of sentry, and limits of your post are part of your special orders. Within the limits of your post, you have authority over all persons, and it is your duty to challenge and, if necessary, detain all persons acting in a suspicious manner. You should apprehend all persons involved in disorder or discovered committing a crime. All persons detained or apprehended are turned over to the petty officer of the watch. You should fire your weapon only as a last resort. Smoking in a prohibited area, for example, is hardly a shooting offense. There are times, however, when firing at another person may be justified, but only after all means of defense of crime prevention have failed. In general, such times are as follows:
    a. To protect your own or other's life.
    b. To prevent the escape of a person known to have a serious crime such as armed robbery, rape, or murder.
    c. To prevent sabotage, espionage, arson, and other crimes against the government. If you must fire your weapon, attempt to wound instead of killing the person on whom you fire.

  2. Walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert, and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing.
    Keep turning your head as you walk your post, observing everything ahead and to the sides. If you hear a strange noise, investigate it. You cannot expect to stand all your watches in fair weather. When the weather is bad, you will be issued appropriate clothing. Do not stand near a tree to keep out of the rain or stay behind a building to get out of a cold wind; during times of bad weather and darkness, you must stay particularly alert.

  3. Report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce.
    If a person is acting from thoughtlessness, you need only remind the offender of the regulation being broken. If you see a person starting to light a cigarette in a no smoking zone, for example, or a visitor blundering into a restricted area, you need only tell the person the regulation in effect. If the person is willfully violating the regulation, however, like trying to jump a fence or steal Navy property, you must stop the person and place the offender under apprehension; then call for the petty officer of the watch. If the person tries to escape, give the order to halt. If the person does not obey, fire into the air; if the person does not stop, fire at the fleeing party's legs, subject to the limitations given under general order 1. If the offender escapes, report the matter as quickly as you can to the petty officer of the watch. In every instance, try to remember what the offender looked like so you may identify the person. Do not leave your post to chase the person unless immediate action is essential.

  4. Repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guardhouse or quarterdeck than my own.
    Suppose your post number is 3. To call the petty officer of the watch for any purpose other than relief, fire, or disorder, you call "petty officer of the watch, post number 3." Sentry number 2 will repeat your call, giving your number, and so will sentry number 1. Thus, the petty officer will know immediately which post to go to. Similarly, if the sentry number 4 calls out, repeat the call, giving his or her number.

  5. Quit my post only when properly relieved.
    If you are not relieved on time, do not abandon your post, but call the petty officer of the watch for instructions. If you require relief because of sickness or other reason, call, "petty officer of the watch, post number____, relief."

  6. Receive, obey, and pass on to the sentry who relieves me, all orders from the commanding officer, command duty officer, officer of the day, officer of the deck, and all officers and petty officers of the watch only.
    During your tour of duty, you are subject to the orders of the commanding officer, executive officer, officer of the day, and the officers and petty officers of the watch only. Other officers and petty officers have no authority to take or inspect your weapon, to tell you how to stand your watch, or to order you to leave your post. Such other officers, however, still have the authority to investigate your conduct and to report it. Thus, an enemy agent cannot dress up in an officer's uniform and order you from your post. You obey orders only from officers whom you know are authorized to give commands related to your sentry duty. However, a passing naval officer who believes you are standing a poor watch may ask your name and post and report any observations to your superior.

  7. Talk to no one except in the line of duty.
    When you challenge or talk with a person, take the position of port arms. Answer questions briefly, but courteously. Normally, if you maintain silence and military bearing, visitors will not try to engage you in long conversations. If, however, visitors or other naval personnel show a desire to pass the time of the day with you, you must say politely to them "excuse me, I am on duty and cannot talk with you further. Please move on." If they refuse to move on, or show signs of becoming disorderly, you should call for the petty officer of the watch. Remember, if your superiors see you chatting while on duty, they will hold you responsible, not your visitor.

  8. Give the alarm in case of fire or disorder.
    In case of fire, you immediately call, "Fire post number____" and sound whatever alarm is available. When you are sure your alarm has been heard by other sentries or by the petty officer of the watch, see what you can do about putting out the fire if you can do so safely and without leaving your post; otherwise, remain where you can direct apparatus to the fire. Remember that the fire may be a trick to lure you away from your post. You must remain vigilant, even amid the confusion and excitement that accompanies a fire. What we have said about fire applies also for disorder. In the event of a disorder, call the petty officer of the watch immediately; then try to quite the trouble. If you approach the disorder first, you might be overcome and then could not give the alarm. Sometimes you can stop a disorder before it becomes too serious by calling to the persons involved, " I have reported you to the petty officer of the watch, who will be along immediately. Come to order now; further trouble will make matters worse for you." The persons concerned may realize you are right and follow your orders. If they do, maintain watch over them but do not approach too closely. Keep your weapon at port arms.

  9. Call the corporal of the guard, or officer of the deck, in any case not covered by instructions.
    When you do not know what to do, call the officer of the deck.

  10. Salute all officers and all colors and standards not cased.
    As used here, colors and standards both refer to the national ensign. The ensign is called the national colors (or just colors) when it is flying from a staff or pike carried by an individual or displayed in a fixed location, as from a flagpole. When mounted on a vehicle, the ensign is called the national standard. (Colors and standards are cased when they are furled and placed in a protected covering.) For sentries, the rules for saluting are the same as for non-watchstanders with the following modifications; a. If you are walking your post or patrolling while armed with a rifle, you halt and salute by presenting arms; when at sling arms you render the hand salute. b. If you are in a sentry box, you stand at attention in the doorway when an officer approaches; if you are armed with a rifle, you present arms. If otherwise armed, you render the hand salute. If you are on duty in front of a building or passageway entrance where there is heavy traffic of officers, you may render the rifle salute at order arms. If you are in a conversation with an officer, you do not interrupt the conversation to salute another officer. If the officer with you salutes a senior, however, then you also salute. c. During the time of challenging, you do not salute an officer until the officer has advanced and has been duly recognized. You do not salute if to do so will interfere with the proper execution of your specific duties.

  11. Be especially watchful at night, and during the time for challenging, challenge all persons on or near my post and allow no one to pass without proper authority.
    When you see a person approaching your post, take the position of port arms and call "Halt! Who is here?" The challenge must be made at a distant sufficient to prevent your being rushed by the person being challenged. If the person answers" Friend" or " Petty officer of the watch" or gives another reply indicating a friendly nature, call, "Advance (friend, and so on) to be recognized." If you challenge a party of persons, after receiving a reply indicating the part is friendly, you call, "Advance one person to be recognized." When you have identified the one, you have the person bring up the rest of the party and identify each individual. You must positively identify all persons challenged before permitting them to pass. If you cannot identify them to your satisfaction, detain them and call the petty officer of the watch. Never permit more than one person to advance at a time. If two persons approach at one time, have them halt; then advance the senior and pass that person (if properly identified) before advancing the other person . If the people are in a vehicle, you halt them and inspect the driver's or the passenger's credentials, as appropriate. (Normally, inspecting the driver of a military vehicle is sufficient; but for a commercial truck or taxi, you should check the passengers too.) If you believe there is something suspicious about the vehicle or its occupants, direct one of the occupants to get out and approach you for recognition. If you are not satisfied beyond a reasonable doubt that the people are authorized to pass, detain the person pr party and call the petty officer of the watch. When challenging, advancing, and passing persons and patrols, always stand where you can get a good look at them in such a way that you are protected from a surprise attack.

Chain of Command

National Chain of Command

Commander-in-Chief:

The Honorable Donald Trump

Vice President:

The Honorable Michael Pence

Secretary of State:

The Honorable Rex Tillerson

Secretary of Defense:

The Honorable James Mattis

Secretary of the Navy:

The Honorable Richard Spencer

Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff:

General Joseph Dunford

Chief of Naval Operations:

Admiral John Richardson

Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy:

Master Chief Petty Officer Steven Giordano

Commander of Naval Education and Training Command:

Rear Admiral Kyle Cozad

Commander of Naval Service Training Command:

Rear Admiral Michael Bernacchi

Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps:

Sergeant Major Ronald Green

Commandant of the Marine Corps:

General Robert Neller

Area 12 Manager:

Commander Rustie Hibbard (USN RET)

Unit Chain of Command

Senior Naval Science Instructor:

Lieutenant Commander James Rachal (USN RET)

Naval Science Instructors:

Chief Petty Officer Thayer Mack (USN RET)

Gunnery Sergeant Christopher Glocke (USMC RET)

Commanding Officer:

Cadet Commander Zechariah Pantin

Executive Officer:

Cadet Lieutenant Commander Deanna Frost

Command Master Chief:

Cadet Master Chief Petty Officer Justin Phillips

Operations Officer:

Cadet Lieutenant Daniel Simonds

Administrations Officer:

Cadet Lieutenant Jessica Wright

Supply Officer:

Cadet Lieutenant Summer Gaddis

Logistics Officer:

Cadet Petty Officer Kiriana Escobar

Ordnance Officer:

Cadet Ensign Cody Sharkey

Public Affairs Officer:

Cadet Petty Officer Bethany Goraczewski

Financial Officer:

Cadet Chief Petty Officer Kylie Bishop

Website Officer:

Cadet Petty Officer Autumn Pitts

Alpha Company Commander:

Cadet Ensign Gabrielle Flores

Bravo Company Commander:

Cadet Ensign Paige Turner

Rates and Ranks

In the Navy, enlisted personnel have rates, which signify ther level of proficiency. An enlisted personnel's rating badge is expressed through two criteria: their rate, or pay-grade, which goes from E-1 to E-9, and their rating, which is their occupation specialty. Those who choose to earn a college degree can commision into the Navy as an officer. Officers have ranks, representative of their pay-grade which range from O-1 to O-10.


Click on any of the rates/ranks to hide the name for studying purposes.
Click one of the two buttons below to hide or show all of the rates/ranks.






Enlisted Rates
United States Marine Corps
E-1

No insignia


Seaman Recruit


No insignia


Seaman Recruit


No insignia


Private
E-2
Seaman Apprentice

Seaman Apprentice

Private First Class
E-3
Seaman

Seaman

Lance Corporal
E-4
Petty Officer Third Class

Petty Officer Third Class

Corporal
E-5
Petty Officer Second Class

Petty Officer Second Class

Sergeant
E-6
Petty Officer First Class

Petty Officer First Class

Staff Sergeant
E-7
Chief Petty Officer

Chief Petty Officer

Gunnery Sergeant
E-8
Senior Chief Petty Officer

Senior Chief Petty Officer

Master Sergeant

First Sergeant
E-9


Master Chief Petty Officer


Master Chief Petty Officer of the Navy


Master Chief Petty Officer

Master Gunnery Sergeant

Sergeant Major

Sergeant Major of the Marine Corps
Officer Ranks
O-1
Ensign

Ensign

Second Lieutenant
O-2
Lieutenant Junior Grade

Lieutenant Junior Grade

First Lieutenant
O-3
Lieutenant

Lieutenant

Captain
O-4
Lieutenant Commander

Lieutenant Commander

Major
O-5
Commander

Commander

Lieutenant Colonel
O-6
Captain

Colonel
O-7
Rear Admiral Lower Half

Brigadier General
O-8
Rear Admiral Upper Half

Major General
O-9
Vice Admiral

Lieutenant General
O-10
Admiral

General

Uniform Regulations

Cadets in the NJROTC program typically wear the Naval Service Uniform (NSU) for their inspections. The NSUs they wear are exactly the same as the uniform worn by navy personnel, with the addition of a patch of the NJROTC seal on the left shoulder sleeve. Listed below are the set of regulations and standards for the NSU that cadets must abide by in the proper wearing of the uniform, and the regulations can also be found in this document.


Click each of the images below to enlarge them.


Naval Service Uniform (NSU)

Male Regulations

  • Nametag- the measurement for the nametag is 1/4 of an inch from the top of the right breast pocket to the bottom of the nametag, centered.
  • Ribbons- the measurement for the nametag is 1/4 of an inch from the top of the left breast pocket to the bottom of the ribbons, centered.
  • Belt- the belt is worn with the tip facing to the left from the wearer's point of view. The right edge of the belt will align vertically with the pants zipper and the seam of the shirt (this is known as the gig line).

Female Regulations

  • Nametag- the measurement for the nametag is 6 and 1/4 of an inch from the right shoulder seam to the bottom of the nametag, centered.
  • Ribbons- the measurement for the ribbons is 6 and 1/4 of an inch from the left shoulder seam to the bottom of the ribbons, centered.

Both

Service Dress Blues (SDB)

Male Regulations

  • Rank Insignia- the measurement for the rank insignia on male SDBs is 1/2 of an inch from the notch in the lapel on the right side to the bottom of the rank, centered.
  • J-bar- the measurement for the j-bar on male SDBs is 1/2 of an inch from the notch in the lapel on the left side to the bottom of the j-bar, centered.
  • Ribbons- the measurement for ribbons on male SDBs is 1/4 of an inch from the top of the left breast pocket to the bottom of the ribbons, centered.
  • Nametag- the nametag is on the right side and must be aligned horizontally with the ribbons.

Female Regulations

  • Rank Insignia- the measurement for the rank insignia on female SDBs is 1 inch from the bottom edge of the collar on the right side to the bottom of the rank, centered.
  • J-bar- the measurement for the j-bar on female SDBs is 1 inch from the bottom edge of the collar on the left side to the bottom of the j-bar, centered.
  • Ribbons- the measurement for ribbons on female SDBs is 1/4 of an inch from the top of the left breast pocket to the bottom of the ribbons, centered.
  • Nametag- the measurement for nametag on female SDBs is 1/4 of an inch from the top of the right breast pocket to the bottom of the nametag, centered.

Overall Uniform Regulations

Male

  • Hair- male hair cannot exceed 2 inches in bulk nor 4 inches in length. Hair above the ears and around the neck must also be tapered upwards 3/4 of an inch and outwards no more than 3/4 of an inch.
  • Shave- sideburns must be neatly trimmed and cannot extend past the middle of the ear. Mustaches are allowed so long as they do not extend past the upper lip nor the corners of the mouth.
  • Fingernails- cannot extend past the fingertips.
  • Earrings- males are not permitted to wear any earrings whatsoever, nor have a piercing of any kind.

Female

  • Hair- female hair cannot exceed 2 inches in bulk, and may not extend past the lower edge of the collar. Hair that does extend past this point must be worn up in a bun or braid that is able to fit under a garrison cover (see section 1-5 of the NJROTC Cadet Field Manual for examples of acceptable hairstyles). Any hair ornaments must be similar to hair color.
  • Cosmetics- any makeup must blend with the natural skin tone, and lipstick should be worn conservatively.
  • Fingernails- cannot be excessive in length and nail polish must complement the skin tone.
  • Earrings- one ball or stud may be worn on each ear on the earlobe only. The earring must be silver if the cadet is an E-6 or below, and gold if they are E-7 or above.

Both

Bulkhead Words

Our unit has a list of bulkhead words, comparable to a typical word wall, that describe several of the key concepts vital to the character of our unit.

Cadet Creed

I am a Navy Junior ROTC Cadet

I strive to promote patriotism and become an informed and responsible citizen

I respect those in position of authority

I support those who have defended freedom and democracy around the world

I proudly embrace the Navy's core values of honor, courage, and committment

I committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all